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Born: 2/28/1874, Died: 12/30/1948

Best known as an architect of Protestant churches, George E. Savage was born in Ayre, Scotland, to Samuel and Katherine Thompson Savage. While he was still a child, his family re-located to Philadelphia; and George E. Savage graduated from Central High School in 1892 and then received his Certificate in Architecture/Building Construction from Drexel Institute in 1900. He worked for church designer Charles Bolton for three years and then was elevated to the status of partner for one year before striking out on his own, building upon the skills that he had acquired in the Bolton office. By 1903 Savage had successfully launched a practice which would continue until his death. Although, of course, a great number of Savage church designs can be found in Philadelphia (Oak Lane Baptist Church; Westminster Presbyterian Church; Immanuel Methodist Church; St. Andrews Lutheran Church), equally large numbers can be found in the suburbs of Philadelphia and also into New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, Ohio, New York, and Washington, DC. Savage designed over 300 churches during his professional life and was succeeded in the church-based practice by his son George D. Savage.

Savage joined the T-Square Club in 1896, and he was also a member of the American Institute of Architects.

Written by Sandra L. Tatman.

Clubs and Membership Organizations

  • American Institute of Architects (AIA)
  • Philadelphia Chapter, AIA
  • T-Square Club
  • Manufacturers Club
  • Masons
  • Oak Park United Presbyterian Church

School Affiliations

  • Drexel Institute

 

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